Clay Explorations

Every week at the Decorative and Fine Arts Camp we start off the week with painting in the mornings and clay in the afternoon! It’s always a big hit. We have a clay tile relief sculpture project with more specific instructions and then campers also have the freedom to do free experimentation and sculpture making. These small sculptures usually reflect their own interests, such as foods, animals or fictional characters!

20190621_12551420190621_13335320190621_13342820190621_13351520190621_13392920190621_134231.jpg20190628_13190120190628_13192920190628_13203920190628_132004.jpg20190628_13205120190628_13210820190705_13043920190705_13102220190705_13151420190705_13193820190705_13224620190705_13263720190705_133006

20190705_133330
Bart Simpson

20190705_135111

20190705_135411
A villager? (If you’re familiar with Minecraft you’ll understand.)

20190705_135509

Advertisements

Mushy Maché

We are having so much fun with papier maché and recycled materials this summer at the Decorative and Fine Arts Camp! Students help us amass a selection of cool shaped recyclables like berry containers cans and paper towel rolls and transform them into papier maché sculptures.

20190619_13382220190619_14282720190619_14311720190620_10303220190620_10310120190620_10313820190620_103150.jpg20190620_10325420190620_10325920190620_10332320190620_10342620190621_13350220190625_13385020190625_133858-e1562422223905.jpg20190625_13391320190627_10085320190627_10111720190627_10120320190627_10122420190627_10190720190627_10200720190627_10263320190627_10272820190628_131835

Rolling into Summer with Color Wheels!

I couldn’t be more proud/happy/excited/nervous/ecstatic/ready to be back at the Decorative and Fine Arts Camp, and this time as the camp owner. Since my amazing mentor and talented sculptor Sinclair Hamilton retired I will now be running the Decorative and Fine Arts Camp under Emma Teaches Art LLC. and in partnership with Glen Echo.

So far the first two weeks were full, and full of fun. If you have been following me for years you’ve seen this project before, but here we have our first and signature camp project. The DFAC covers all sorts of art-making, and we start our week with painting. The color wheel project is also differentiated by campers ages and weeks of experience at the camp. This means that campers who have never been at DFAC before and are 7 and under start with “color wheel A”.

20190625_09592220190619_10445620190625_100111

Those campers who have never been at DFAC before and are 8 and up start with “color wheel B” a slightly more complicated version of the color wheel.

20190702_10201920190626_10041620190626_10040920190702_112650

20190702_112828
The black Background is how we finish off the wheels!

Those campers who have been at DFAC before and have completed “color wheel B” move on to “color wheel C” a slightly more complicated version of “color wheel B,” but with the challenge of choosing their own colors, and this trend continues in color wheels “D,E,F”. (You get the idea)

20190626_10052120190627_101142.jpg

Finally, campers who have returned enough times to get to F then get to invent their own color wheel, shapes and all!

20190702_10141720190620_10321120190619_104529

Summer Fun

I have the wonderful gift of being able to stay home with my daughter during the summer and we had an amazing time going down to the museums and making art together at home. However, I did let grandma take her for a week so that I could substitute for an old friend at the Decorative Fine Arts summer camp at Glen Echo. This is an art camp I worked at for many years during college and my early teaching years. It’s projects are dynamic, engaging, and colorful!

You can see in the pictures below that children get to work with a variety of media through-out the week.

20180727_13250220180727_13294320180727_13511320180727_13512620180727_135327DSC_0008sam_0739sam_1050

Working Weekends: My Second (Third and Fourth) Job(s)

If you’ve known me for a while then you know I’ve worked at Glen Echo Park in Maryland for eight of the past nine summers now, and about nine weeks each summer. I took off one summer to travel to Salamanca Spain, where my father re-married and I studied Spanish at the Universidad de Salamanca. I also took many many painting and sculpture classes at Glen Echo Park as a high school student, which is how I got my summer job many years ago. It is also where I discovered my love of painting and clay sculpture. Two forms of art I still practice today. I took painting with the famous Bartman’s and sculpture classes with Sinclair Hamilton, who owned a summer camp as well and hired me when he heard I was off to Pratt to study art education.

So if you can’t already tell, I am very fond of this place, Glen Echo. So you won’t be surprised to find out that I have taken up a second/third/fourth job here as a part time administrator for a drop-in family art studio run by PGiP, an occasional sales-person/gift shop duties for the Popcorn Gallery, and an Art Party facilitator, where a birthday party of six year olds and I made mosaics, and learned about Antoni Gaudi. It’s not that I desperately need the money, I don’t, but it helps. I am planning to get married this October and if I am going to have all the little extras I want, I need a bit more wiggle room. Also, I believe that before I have kids, and need to dedicate entire weekends to them, and before I get too bogged down with all of the extra work of keeping a house, I see no good reason not to work an occasional weekend. I have always thrived on a full schedule anyways. It’s the same reasn I find work each summer.

Unfortunately, I wont be returning to the Decorative Fine Arts Camp this summer. I will instead be teaching a summer art program called Multi-Dimensional Studio at my current and fantastic school: Stone Ridge School of the Sacred Heart. Below is the description I wrote for this course:

An exploration in the decorative and fine arts, Multi-Dimensional Studio will challenge students to find new meaning in art through studio work and museum visits.   Materials explored will include acrylic paint on canvas, soft sculptures, mixed media collage, recycled/upcycled art, charcoal drawing, digital photography and film.  Multi-Dimensional Studio is designed to introduce various art mediums, techniques and styles. Students will study the basic elements and principles of art and design, and use these elements and principles to guide and assess their work.  There will also be multiple field trips to mart museums like the Smithsonian’s Freer and Sackler Galleries, as well as the National Gallery of art and the Hirshorn. Students will develop their critical thinking skills while they assess their own artwork as well as famous works of art. 

It is open to all area high school students and I am really excited about being able to offer a summer course. I will, of course, miss Glen Echo and the Decorative Fine Arts Camp terribly. What summer is complete without the sound of the carousel pumping out its barrel organ tunes, filling up the park with an air of excitement. I will miss counting down from three to a room full of twenty-five campers wiggling in their seats, excited for the next demonstration. Most of all I will miss the raw, fearless art of young children, lacking all that self-doubt and un-necessary modesty that teenage girls impose on theirs. However, I am also thrilled at the prospect of teaching a museum, and self-discovery based summer program for teens that will have ideal hours for both travel and studio time that a regular school year schedule just cannot provide.

Moving backwards a bit…

Below are some photographs I took of the Candy Corner building at glen echo where these drop-in family art studio run by PGiP are happening. My colleague Meredith, an inspired  PGiP educator, has been constructing amazing and lovely art activities for families that surprisingly accessible to all ages and vary each week. The space is amazing and Meredith does a fantastic job setting up a welcoming environment for the families each Saturday. I love getting to see what’s new and happening each time I go!

20140315_120926

20140315_120933

20140315_120950

20140315_121010

20140315_121026

20140315_121036

20140315_121053

20140315_121102

20140315_121225

20140315_121304

The Best of Glen Echo

1005901_745091034605_2100699254_n

The summer is finally over and I am two weeks deep into work at my new school, which we will call “The Girls School.” I have been busy with my move from Philadelphia to Washington, DC and the transition to my new job, but I feel like it is important to get some documentation from this amazing summer in Maryland up, before I forget. Below are some of my favorite gems from this summer at Glen Echo Park, Decorative Fine Arts Camp.

559724_615904668430805_1561059832_n

971693_606405076047431_2087875174_n

1005470_615905338430738_891291105_n

1157707_615904878430784_779325548_n

1016402_751534042765_833789626_n

1069243_751805543675_1368986389_n

 

Painted Ceramics

On Monday in the afternoon my Decorative Fine Arts Campers create decorative tiles, that become mini relief sculptures. They also create sculptures using the pinching and pulling technique. When it comes time to paint the finished, fired pieces I only do a brief demonstration and then let my students help themselves to paint (at this point during the week they are very familiar with the paint supplies) and get to work.

The Wonder of Fossils

On Thursday afternoons at the Decorative Fine Arts camp, we gather rocks and leaves and bits of plants to bring back into the classroom. Then, with all the lights dimmed, I tell my students the story of how I found my first fossil while canoing down the Shenandoah River. It goes something like, “we all stopped for lunch on a beach made of rocks and when I kicked one over …what do you know! I found a fossil!” I then pass that around. I also pass around a fossil my mothers plumber gave me, another one that belongs to  the camp owner, and another piece of fossilized crocodile poo that my dad got me as a gag gift for Christmas. You can imagine the reaction I get to that one. It is always some sort of collective mix of “ewwwww” and “ahhhhhh” followed by “awesome!” and “gross!”

After we talk a little about how we think fossils are made I demonstrate how we are going to make our own. First we will roll out the clay, just like we did while making our clay tiles Monday. Then we cut out a shape, just like we did while making our clay tiles Monday, except this time we don’t cut a square we cut off a one inch border and set it to the side. (The border will later become a wall) Then we roll the impression of some leaves on using the rolling pin, and press in shells. Using our border we create a wall that will keep our “instant rock” in place while it dries. (Plaster of Paris)

Friday morning after we are done making our accordion books the children discover that a hard white object has covered up their designs on their slabs of clay. “What is this?” “Where is my fossil?” I love these questions because I can always say, “I don’t know, why don’t you peel all of that clay off and find out!” and then TA_DA! an inverted replica of their design has now been discoverd on the underside of the white “instant rock”. I normally don’t like being crowded by students saying “look! LOOK!” but I make an exception for this project. I am happy that I have added an element of discovery to the project.

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑