Clay Explorations

Every week at the Decorative and Fine Arts Camp we start off the week with painting in the mornings and clay in the afternoon! It’s always a big hit. We have a clay tile relief sculpture project with more specific instructions and then campers also have the freedom to do free experimentation and sculpture making. These small sculptures usually reflect their own interests, such as foods, animals or fictional characters!

20190621_12551420190621_13335320190621_13342820190621_13351520190621_13392920190621_134231.jpg20190628_13190120190628_13192920190628_13203920190628_132004.jpg20190628_13205120190628_13210820190705_13043920190705_13102220190705_13151420190705_13193820190705_13224620190705_13263720190705_133006

20190705_133330
Bart Simpson

20190705_135111

20190705_135411
A villager? (If you’re familiar with Minecraft you’ll understand.)

20190705_135509

Back to Recycling!

Just like last year, my Foundations of Studio Art classes are saving the planet with recycled art projects!

Here you can see what we have begun calling our “trash island”. It is an ever-growing pile of stuff that has potential as art supplies. However it kind of explodes each class, and has to be re-sorted at the end of each class period. Thank goodness for 80 minute class periods!20160224_125520

This time around we have expanded the number of attachment materials available to the girls. My classroom has recently gotten more basic tools, including an electric drill and a hand saw, as well as a sewing machine. This has opened up more possibilities for my students.

20160224_125647

20160303_084958

20160303_085051

20160303_085127

20160303_085230

20160303_085249

20160303_085322

20160304_092331

20160304_092342

20160304_092409

20160304_092453

20160304_092543

Here is my classroom at the end of a crazy whirlwind day of creating and making. You can see examples of Louise Nevelson, our inspiration for the day, on my television screen. I know you can’t tell much from our progress photos, but just wait! These recycled art sculptures are going to be amazing!

20160304_092712

 

And So It Begins…

I know, I know, it’s October, but September is a busy month for teachers, especially this one. I have been very busy adjusting for the exciting new changes that came with this year. To begin with, we have two new teachers in our upper school visual  art department. That makes four of us. We have yours truly, our foundations of studio art teacher, and Katya our photography teacher, and new this year are Tom, our ceramics teacher, and Lee, our advanced studio art teacher. Second thing that’s new this year is that I’m teaching not only Foundations of Studio Art and Yearbook, but I am adding a section of Studio II. This means I’m dropping one of my four Foundations of Studio Art classes and handing it over to Tom, our new ceramics teacher. I am thrilled to be adding a class, but it has kept me busy with syllabus planning, and making sure to communicate my lesson plans and objectives with another teacher. This also means that the classroom is now being shared by not two, but three teachers at a time. This has kept us very busy, since I saw this as a great time for total classroom re-organization! Finally, LaShonda the Physics teacher and I have been collaborating and lining up our curriculum for the sake of cross-disciplinary learning for two years now. This summer we presented our development of this program at the NCGS conference. However, this year, for the first time, we have to share our initiative with an additional physics teacher and a new foundations teacher. (More on that later.) So big changes, but good changes, and all bode well for the fantastic year ahead.

So Lets begin with Foundations of Studio Art. A wonderful place to begin. We are once again starting slow and steady with our unit on Light and Color. We began with Color Wheels and are going to work our way up to single object still life paintings.

20150908_104250

In Studio II we began our year with a unit on line. Line is a fine place to start. Our plan is to  move on to book-making as a short break from drawing as well as a focus on craftsmanship, and then re-visit drawing through value, and eventually paint!

20150910_093524

And Finally, in Yearbook we are charging into the year full steam! Our three student Editors, and our staff are running the show. They have already chosen our theme for the year (TOP SECRET) and our color scheme, fonts, and many other pieces. We’ve even started designing the senior pages. These are entire pages of the book, one dedicated to each senior, with photos and quotes selected by them.

Screenshot 2015-10-06 16.05.32

 

La Grande Finale!

Now that our school year has come to a close, I finally have time to brag a bit about the amazing success of my classes final exam. Each student was given the task of designing their own projects for themselves, setting goals, and sketching out a plan for action. They were asked to draw from skills they picked up during the year, and they were limited to using only the materials we had explored in class. As I suspected a lot of my girls returned to painting. (Which is why finishing up with the collaging-for-paint’s-sake assignment was, albeit accidentally, BRILLIANT!) However, many of them chose other mediums and mixed them in un-expected ways. I am especially pleased to see that so many of my girls were comfortable with returning to photoshop and digital photography.
20150511_083415

20150511_103530

20150511_091115

20150511_083434

20150511_083428

20150511_083420^Works in progress

in classroom

cube

cloakroom^Digital meets hand drawn cartoon masterpieces!

20150520_083455

20150520_083447

20150520_083434^A Series of watercolor emotions.

20150520_083227^Digital Photography altered by hand.

20150520_083106^Three Studies of the Potomac River.

20150520_083031^The Eastern Shore.

20150520_082944^A Brilliant Sunset.

20150520_082848^Exploring light and a love of New York City.

20150520_082737

20150520_082725^Detailed studies of the human face.

20150520_082646^A girls best friend.

20150520_082555^This piece is an extrodinary piece of work. This is done in sharpie and acrylic paint, and it is an expansion of a series of notebook doodles. What I love about this piece is that not only did my student spend more than 8 hours finishing it, but she accidentally began what could very well be an AP portfolio concentration.

20150520_081615^Gorgeous sunset.

20150520_081600^An Indian Elephant.

20150520_081547

20150520_081539^A life sized mixed-media painting of a movie star type, in a real fabric dress.

20150520_081528^An impressive close-up of an eye.

julia photoshop 5

bridget photoshop 4

bridget photoshop 2

bridget photoshop 1^A series of Digital imagery altered in photoshop.

2 yellow and pink edited final

6 edited 4 final

4 eye pic final^A colorful photoshoot, inspired by color runs.

 

 

 

Working Weekends: My Second (Third and Fourth) Job(s)

If you’ve known me for a while then you know I’ve worked at Glen Echo Park in Maryland for eight of the past nine summers now, and about nine weeks each summer. I took off one summer to travel to Salamanca Spain, where my father re-married and I studied Spanish at the Universidad de Salamanca. I also took many many painting and sculpture classes at Glen Echo Park as a high school student, which is how I got my summer job many years ago. It is also where I discovered my love of painting and clay sculpture. Two forms of art I still practice today. I took painting with the famous Bartman’s and sculpture classes with Sinclair Hamilton, who owned a summer camp as well and hired me when he heard I was off to Pratt to study art education.

So if you can’t already tell, I am very fond of this place, Glen Echo. So you won’t be surprised to find out that I have taken up a second/third/fourth job here as a part time administrator for a drop-in family art studio run by PGiP, an occasional sales-person/gift shop duties for the Popcorn Gallery, and an Art Party facilitator, where a birthday party of six year olds and I made mosaics, and learned about Antoni Gaudi. It’s not that I desperately need the money, I don’t, but it helps. I am planning to get married this October and if I am going to have all the little extras I want, I need a bit more wiggle room. Also, I believe that before I have kids, and need to dedicate entire weekends to them, and before I get too bogged down with all of the extra work of keeping a house, I see no good reason not to work an occasional weekend. I have always thrived on a full schedule anyways. It’s the same reasn I find work each summer.

Unfortunately, I wont be returning to the Decorative Fine Arts Camp this summer. I will instead be teaching a summer art program called Multi-Dimensional Studio at my current and fantastic school: Stone Ridge School of the Sacred Heart. Below is the description I wrote for this course:

An exploration in the decorative and fine arts, Multi-Dimensional Studio will challenge students to find new meaning in art through studio work and museum visits.   Materials explored will include acrylic paint on canvas, soft sculptures, mixed media collage, recycled/upcycled art, charcoal drawing, digital photography and film.  Multi-Dimensional Studio is designed to introduce various art mediums, techniques and styles. Students will study the basic elements and principles of art and design, and use these elements and principles to guide and assess their work.  There will also be multiple field trips to mart museums like the Smithsonian’s Freer and Sackler Galleries, as well as the National Gallery of art and the Hirshorn. Students will develop their critical thinking skills while they assess their own artwork as well as famous works of art. 

It is open to all area high school students and I am really excited about being able to offer a summer course. I will, of course, miss Glen Echo and the Decorative Fine Arts Camp terribly. What summer is complete without the sound of the carousel pumping out its barrel organ tunes, filling up the park with an air of excitement. I will miss counting down from three to a room full of twenty-five campers wiggling in their seats, excited for the next demonstration. Most of all I will miss the raw, fearless art of young children, lacking all that self-doubt and un-necessary modesty that teenage girls impose on theirs. However, I am also thrilled at the prospect of teaching a museum, and self-discovery based summer program for teens that will have ideal hours for both travel and studio time that a regular school year schedule just cannot provide.

Moving backwards a bit…

Below are some photographs I took of the Candy Corner building at glen echo where these drop-in family art studio run by PGiP are happening. My colleague Meredith, an inspired  PGiP educator, has been constructing amazing and lovely art activities for families that surprisingly accessible to all ages and vary each week. The space is amazing and Meredith does a fantastic job setting up a welcoming environment for the families each Saturday. I love getting to see what’s new and happening each time I go!

20140315_120926

20140315_120933

20140315_120950

20140315_121010

20140315_121026

20140315_121036

20140315_121053

20140315_121102

20140315_121225

20140315_121304

Flashback/Flash Forward

It is getting close to summertime and I am experiencing nostalgia.  I have now worked for 8 years as a summer art teacher at one of the most beautiful national park cites in the US, Glen Echo Park in Maryland. Here are a few gems from last year.

IMAG0644

IMAG0621

 

IMAG0631

IMAG0624

Subbing

I substitute taught an after-school class today on Roosevelt Island. It was my first time ever on the Island and I was so excited to have an excuse to go. However, today’s weather couldn’t of been more drizzly and gray. It did make for some dramatic pictures. This is looking west from the Island at Manhattan.

We read the book, Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? by Bill Martin Jr. and Eric Carle. And then each of us chose an animal and a color, pink for a pig, yellow for a lion, brown for a dog, green for a frog. We gathered all of the scraps we could find in those colors. Then we assembled our animal, using other scraps and eventually oil pastels to put on the finishing touches.

New York Snow

Today, up in Hudson Heights, my “Let’s look in our favorite book!” class had our second in-home lesson. In honor of the snow we read The Mitten, by Jan Brett. (My favorite winter time children’s book.) And then Painted the snow. I brought brown and red paper so that our white and blue tempera paint would have contrast. Even though brown is more of a ground-like color everybody choose red. I am happy to give the children choices when it comes to their projects. Because I already pick the material and give a general topic, it is important that they also have the opportunity to make artistic choices.

After painting snow for a while we looked at Eloise, by Kay Thompson. We didn’t read the whole story, but we did look at her messy room. And then we made our own messy rooms. For the younger boys I included squiggles and curly curves to show how my shoes flew when I kicked them off my feet, and my coat soared through the air when I shucked it off. I wanted to emphasize that this did not have to be a representational drawing. For the older girls I drew a bed and some boots. After we drew these with oil pastels it was important that we talk about how drawing with oil pastels was different from chalk, crayons, and colored pencils. We decided that they were very soft and very oily. Last, we used watercolor to finish up our awesome, messy bedrooms.

After class I took this picture of the amazing view from the 190th St. A train station.

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑